QUALITY AND AFFORDABLE HEALTH SERVICES AT KINTAMPO - GHANA

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Why Is Breakfast Important?

Posted by [email protected] on March 27, 2014 at 6:15 PM Comments comments (1)

Why Is Breakfast Important?

* Breakfast is the most important meal of the day and plays a key role in helping tackle obesity. Eating breakfast has long term health benefits can reduce obesity, high blood pressure, heart disease and diabetes.

* Eating a healthy breakfast every day gives your brain and body a boost.

Here are some reasons why making time in the morning for breakfast really does make a difference.

Now lets take a look at this;

* Breakfast gives you energy - Breakfast tops up your energy stores for the day and helps to regulate blood sugar. At least around 25 per cent of your daily food intake should come from breakfast.


* Breakfast gives your brain a boost - Eating breakfast helps improve your memory, concentration and aspects of mental performance just like any other organ in the body, your brain needs energy in order to work at its best.


* Breakfast can make you happier - Eating something in the morning can help improve your mood and make you feel less stressed. Going for long periods without eating can result in low blood sugar which can affect

mood.


* Breakfast is good for your waistline - People who eat breakfast are less likely to be overweight and more likely to be in their ideal weight range than people who skip breakfast. Skipping breakfast can make you more likely to reach for high sugar and fatty snacks too.


* Breakfast provides important nutrients - If you miss breakfast you may miss out on

important nutrients . Breakfast foods are good

sources of nutrients such as calcium, iron and

B Vitamins, as well as protein and fibre.

Now we know never skip your breakfast rather consume for better health.

CHOLESTEROL

Posted by [email protected] on March 27, 2014 at 6:10 PM Comments comments (0)

* Cholesterol is a lipid (fat) which is produced by the liver. Cholesterol is vital for normal body function. Every cell in our body has cholesterol in its outer layer.


* The word "cholesterol" comes from the Greek word chole, meaning "bile", and the Greek word stereos, meaning "solid, stiff".


FUNCTIONS OF CHOLESTEROL

- It builds and maintains cell membranes.

- It is essential for determining which

molecules can pass into the cell and which cannot (cell membrane permeability).

- It is involved in the production of sex

hormones (androgens and estrogens).

- It is essential for the production of

hormones released by the adrenal glands

(cortisol, corticosterone, aldosterone, and others).

- It aids in the production of bile.

- It converts sunshine to vitamin D , which

among other things is said to have cardiovascular benefits.

- It is important for the metabolism of fat

soluble vitamins , including vitamins A, D,

E, and K.

- It insulates nerve fibers.

HOW CHOLESTEROL IS TRANSPORTED IN THE BLOOD


* LDL (low density lipoprotein) - people often refer to it as bad cholesterol. LDL carries cholesterol from the liver to cells. If too much is carried (too much for the cells to use) there can be a harmful buildup of LDL.


* HDL (high density lipoprotein) - people often refer to it as good cholesterol. Experts say HDL prevents arterial disease. HDL does the opposite of LDL - HDL takes the cholesterol away from the cells and back to the liver. In the liver it is either broken down

or expelled from the body as waste.


* Triglycerides - these are the chemical forms in which most fat exists in the body, as well as in food. They are present in blood plasma.

Triglycerides, in association with cholesterol, form the plasma lipids (blood fat).

Triglycerides in plasma originate either from fats in our food, or are made in the body from other energy sources, such as

carbohydrates . Calories we consume but

are not used immediately by our tissues are converted into triglycerides and stored in fat cells.

WHAT ARE THE NORMAL CHOLESTEROL LEVEL


* The amount of cholesterol in human blood

can vary from 3.6 mmol/liter to 7.8 mmol/

liter. Note that any reading over 6 mmol/liter is high and will significantly raise the risk of

arterial disease but most doctor's their way of categorize them. Some include,

- Desirable - Less than 200 mg/dL.

- Bordeline high - 200 to 239 mg/dL.

- High - 240 mg/dL and above.

- Optimum level: less than 5mmol/liter.

- Mildly high cholesterol level: between 5 to 6.4mmol/liter.

- Moderately high cholesterol level: between 6.5 to 7.8mmol/liter.

- Very high cholesterol level: above 7.8mmol/liter.

DANGERS OF HIGH CHOLESTEROL LEVEL

- Atherosclerosis - narrowing of the arteries.

- Higher coronary heart disease risk - an

abnormality of the arteries that supply blood and oxygen to the heart.

- Heart attack - occurs when the supply of blood and oxygen to an area of heart muscle is blocked, usually by a clot in a coronary artery. This causes your heart muscle to die.

- Angina - chest pain or discomfort that occurs when your heart muscle does not get enough blood.

- Stroke and mini-stroke - occurs when a blood clot blocks an artery or vein, interrupting the flow to an area of the brain. Can also occur when a blood vessel breaks or brain cells begin to die.

SYMPTOMS OF HIGH CHOLESTEROL LEVEL

- Narrowed coronary arteries in the heart (angina).

- Leg pain when exercising - this is because the arteries that supply the legs have narrowed.

- Blood clots and ruptured blood vessels

- these can cause a stroke or TIA (mini-stroke ).

- Ruptured plaques - this can lead to coronary thrombosis (a clot forming in one of the arteries that delivers blood to the heart). If this causes significant damage to heart muscle it could cause heart failure .

- Xanthomas - thick yellow patches on the skin, especially around the eyes. They are, in fact, deposits of cholesterol. This is commonly seen among people who have inherited high cholesterol susceptibility (familial or inherited

hypercholesterolaemia).


CAUSES OF HIGH CHOLESTEROL LEVEL

Lifestyle causes

- Nutrition - although some foods contain

cholesterol, such as eggs, kidneys, and some seafoods, dietary cholesterol does not have much of an impact in human blood cholesterol levels. However, saturated fats do! Foods high in saturated fats include red

meat, some pies, sausages, hard cheese, lard, pastry, cakes, most biscuits, and cream (there

are many more).


- Sedentary lifestyle - people who do not

exercise and spend most of their time sitting/lying down have significantly higher levels of LDL (bad cholesterol) and lower levels of HDL

(good cholesterol).


- Bodyweight - people who are overweight/obese are much more likely to have higher LDL levels and lower HDL levels, compared to those who are of normal weight.

- Smoking -this can have quite a considerable effect on LDL levels.


TREATABLE MEDICAL CONDITIONS

- Diabetes .

- High blood pressure (hypertension).

- High levels of triglycerides.

- Kidney diseases.

- Liver diseases.

- Under-active thyroid gland.


TREATMENTS

- Doing plenty of exercise (check with your

doctor).

- Eating plenty of fruits, vegetables, whole

grains, oats, and good quality fats.

- Avoiding foods with saturated fats.

- Getting plenty of sleep (8 hours each night).

- Bringing your bodyweight back to normal.

- Avoiding excessive alcohol intake (as alcohol increases triglycerides)

- Stopping smoking.

Cholesterol-controlling Medications

- Statins (HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors)

- Aspirin

- Niacin

- Anti hypertensive drugs

REDUCING HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE

Posted by [email protected] on March 27, 2014 at 6:05 PM Comments comments (0)

Pressure can boost the risks of leading killers

such as heart attack and stroke, as well as

aneurysms, cognitive decline, and kidney failure.

While medication can lower blood pressure, it

may cause side effects such as leg cramps,

dizziness, and insomnia. Luckily, most people

can bring down their blood pressure naturally

without medication.


* Go for power walks: Hypertensive patients

who went for fitness walks at a brisk pace

lowered pressure by almost 8 mmhg over 6

mmhg. Exercise helps the heart use oxygen more efficiently, so it doesn`t work as hard to pump blood. Slow breathing and meditative practices decrease stress hormones, which elevate renin, a kidney enzyme that raises blood pressure.So try 5 minutes in the morning and at night. Inhale deeply and expand your belly. Exhale and release

all of your tension.


* Eat potatoes : Loading up on potassium-

rich fruits and vegetables is an important

part of any blood pressure-lowering program,

Lower salt intake to 1,500 mg daily.


* Indulge in dark chocolate : Dark chocolate

varieties contain flavanols that make blood

vessels more elastic.


* Take a supplement: Coenzyme Q10 reduced

blood pressure by up to 17mmhg over 10

mmhg.


* Reduce alcohol intake : The less you drink,

the lower your blood pressure will drop to a

point.


* Switch to decaf coffee : Caffeine consumption of 500 mg-roughly three 8-ounce cups of coffee-increased blood pressure by 4 mmhg, and that effect lasted until bedtime.


* Drink tea: 3 cups of a hibiscus tea daily

lowered systolic blood pressure by 7 points in 6 weeks on average.

* Work a bit less : Putting in more than 41 hours per week at the office raises your risk of hypertension by 15percent.


* Relax with music : Listening to soothing

classical music for 30 minutes daily while

breathing slowly helps lower blood pressure.


* Seek help for snoring : Sleep apnea sufferers had high levels of aldosterone, a hormone that can boost blood pressure.


* Jump for soy: Some of the refined

carbohydrates in your diet with foods high in

soy or milk protein, such as low-fat dairy, can

bring down systolic blood pressure if you have

hypertension or prehypertension.


SOURCE OF INFORMATION

Posted by [email protected] on March 27, 2014 at 5:55 PM Comments comments (0)

MOST OF THE INFORMATION SUPPLIED IN THIS "BANK" IS BY THE KIND COURTESY OF MR. PATRICK FYNN (FACEBOOK.COM/PRACTIONERS MEDICAL)


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